{Nourish} What’s Ghee And Should You Use It?

While I will never fully part ways with my beloved grass-fed butter, Ghee has become an integral part of my day to day cooking more recently. Also known as clarified butter, this earthy, nutty ingredient is rich in history, flavor and medicinal properties. You’re gonna love it!

“Ghee is highly prized in Ayurveda for its ability to nourish and lubricate all the tissues of the body, and it is considered to be the essence of milk, and thereby the essence of motherly love. It is said to nourish the body and intellect, down to the very core of your being! Ghee is a beloved healthy fat known to kindle digestion and support a balanced and robust metabolism.” -Banyan Botanticals

What is Ghee?!

Yes, Ghee has become popular more recently but it’s certainly no fad. It’s been used in ancient cultures for centuries.  And, Ghee was not just used for cooking. It’s been used in ceremonial practices, as a moisturizer and it’s even considered medicinal in Ayurvedic practices. 

Ghee is clarified butter meaning the milk solids have been removed. Butter is heated, simmered, and then strained to remove these solids. By doing so, its flavor becomes nuttier, and you’re left the pure butter oil/fat, which comes with many benefits.

Benefits of Ghee:

At the end of the day, Ghee, like butter, is a saturated fat so we want to use it mindfully. 

  1. Suitable for those with dairy intolerance: As stated above, ghee is clarified butter. The milk solids have been removed. Most people with a casein and/or lactose intolerance can consume ghee without any problem because the protein and carbohydrate have been removed by skimming and straining.
  2. High Smoke Point: Most of the oils we see today, with high smoke points, may be highly refined, and can actually be more inflammatory to our systems (canola oil, palm oil, soybean oil, etc.). Yet, with Ghee, once the milk solids have been removed, it has a 450 degree smoke point, making it great for cooking in high heats. When a fat smokes or burns, it denatures the oil and it can produce carcinogens. 
  3. Anti-inflammatory: Gram for gram, Ghee contains more butyric acid than butter. Some animal studies show that butyric acid may reduce inflammation, help maintain healthy insulin levels, improve gut health and have anti-cancer properties. Ghee also contains more conjugaconjugated linoleic acid,  a polyunsaturated fat that may help increase fat loss.
  4. Rich in fat soluble vitamins: Ghee is rich in fat-soluble vitamins A, D and E. Especially as we enter the winter months, ghee helps keep the skin stay moisturized, supplies us with some of the vitamin D we aren’t getting from the bright sunlight, and may helps heal damaged skin with the help of vitamin E.
  5. Longer shelf-life: Another benefit to removing the milk solids is a longer shelf life. Ghee does not have to be refrigerated, and can last about 3 months. If refrigerated, some types of ghee can last up to a year!

What to Look for When Buying Ghee:

Remember ghee is made from butter, which is made from cow’s milk. To ensure the highest quality of ghee, you’ll want to find one that was made from a quality milk-source. Buying grass-fed, organic ghee means the cows were fed their natural food source – grass, or as I like to think of it, vegetables – instead of 100% grains which would make us fat and unhappy too. 

How to use Ghee in Recipes:

Ghee has a nutty, earthy, delicious taste. You can use it the same way you use butter. To saute veggies, spread on toast or a potato! 

Brands I Love: 

  • 4th & Heart
  • Banyan Botanicals
  • Organic Valley 

 

12 thoughts on “{Nourish} What’s Ghee And Should You Use It?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *